Tuesday, August 19, 2014

“Seeking knowledge is mandatory for all Muslims.”

From the very earliest days of Islam, the issue of education has been at the forefront at the minds of the Muslims. The very first word of the Quran that was revealed to Prophet Muhammad ﷺ was, in fact, “Read”. Prophet Muhammad ﷺ once stated that “Seeking knowledge is mandatory for all Muslims.” With such a direct command to go out and seek knowledge, Muslims have placed huge emphasis on the educational system in order to fulfill this obligation placed on them by the Prophet ﷺ.
Throughout Islamic history, education was a point of pride and a field Muslims have always excelled in. Muslims built great libraries and learning centers in places such as Baghdad, Cordoba, and Cairo. They established the first primary schools for children and universities for continuing education. They advanced sciences by incredible leaps and bounds through such institutions, leading up to today’s modern world.

Attitudes Towards Education

Today, education of children is not limited to the information and facts they are expected to learn. Rather, educators take into account the emotional, social, and physical well-being of the student in addition to the information they must master. Medieval Islamic education was no different. The 12th century Syrian physician al-Shayzari wrote extensively about the treatment of students. He noted that they should not be treated harshly, nor made to do busy work that doesn’t benefit them at all. The great Islamic scholar al-Ghazali also noted that “prevention of the child from playing games and constant insistence on learning deadens his heart, blunts his sharpness of wit and burdens his life. Thus, he looks for a ruse to escape his studies altogether.” Instead, he believed that educating students should be mixed with fun activities such as puppet theater, sports, and playing with toy animals.

The First Schools

Ibn Khaldun states in his Muqaddimah, “It should be known that instructing children in the Qur’an is a symbol of Islam. Muslims have, and practice, such instruction in all their cities, because it imbues hearts with a firm belief (in Islam) and its articles of faith, which are (derived) from the verses of the Qur’an and certain Prophetic traditions.”
A miniature from the Ottoman period of students and their teacher
The very first educational institutions of the Islamic world were quite informal. Mosques were used as a meeting place where people can gather around a learned scholar, attend his lectures, read books with him/her, and gain knowledge. Some of the greatest scholars of Islam learned in such a way, and taught their students this way as well. All four founders of the Muslim schools of law – Imams Abu Hanifa, Malik, Shafi’i, and Ibn Hanbal – gained their immense knowledge by sitting in gatherings with other scholars (usually in the mosques) to discuss and learn Islamic law.
Some schools throughout the Muslim world continue this tradition of informal education. At the three holiest sites of Islam – the Haram in Makkah, Masjid al-Nabawi in Madinah, and Masjid al-Aqsa in Jerusalem – scholars regularly sit and give lectures in the mosque that are open to anyone who would like to join and benefit from their knowledge. However, as time went on, Muslims began to build formal institutions dedicated to education.

From Primary to Higher Education

Dating back to at least the 900s, young students were educated in a primary school called a maktab. Commonly, maktabs were attached to a mosque, where the resident scholars and imams would hold classes for children. These classes would cover topics such as basic Arabic reading and writing, arithmetic, and Islamic laws. Most of the local population was educated by such primary schools throughout their childhood. After completing the curriculum of the maktab, students could go on to their adult life and find an occupation, or move on to higher education in a madrasa, the Arabic world for “school”.
The Registan complex in Samarkand, Uzbekistan contains three madrasas in the same square
Madrasas were usually attached to a large mosque. Examples include al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt (founded in 970) and al-Karaouine in Fes, Morocco (founded in 859). Later, numerous madrasas were established across the Muslim world by the great Seljuk vizier, Nizam al-Mulk. At a madrasa, students would be educated further in religious sciences, Arabic, and secular studies such as  medicine, mathematics, astronomy, history, and geography, among many other topics. In the 1100s, there were 75 madrasas in Cairo, 51 in Damascus, and 44 in Aleppo. There were hundreds more in Muslim Spain at this time as well.
These madrasas can be considered the first modern universities. They had separate faculties for different subjects, with resident scholars that had expertise in their fields. Students would pick a concentration of study and spend a number of years studying under numerous professors. Ibn Khaldun notes that in Morocco at his time, the madrasas had a curriculum which spanned sixteen years. He argues that this is the “shortest [amount of time] in which a student can obtain the scientific habit he desires, or can realize that he will never be able to obtain it.”
When a student completed their course of study, they would be granted an ijaza, or a license certifying that they have completed that program and are qualified to teach it as well. Ijazas could be given by an individual teacher who can personally attest to his/her student’s knowledge, or by an institution such as a madrasa, in recognition of a student finishing their course of study. Ijazas today  can be most closely compared to diplomas granted from higher educational institutions.

Education and Women

Throughout Islamic history, educating women has been a high priority. Women were not seen as incapable of attaining knowledge nor of being able to teach others themselves. The precedent for this was set with Prophet Muhammad’s own wife, Aisha, who was one of the leading scholars of her time and was known as a teacher of many people in Madinah after the Prophet’s ﷺ death.
Later Islamic history also shows the influence of women.  Women throughout the Muslim world were able to attend lectures in mosques, attend madrasas, and in many cases were teachers themselves. For example, the 12th century scholar Ibn ‘Asakir (most famous for his book on the history of Damascus,Tarikh Dimashq) traveled extensively in the search for knowledge and studied under 80 different female teachers.
Women also played a major role as supporters of education:
The University of al-Karaouine in Fes, Morocco was founded by Fatima al-Fihri in 859
  • The first formal madrasa of the Muslim world, the University of al-Karaouine in Fes was established in 859 by a wealthy merchant by the name of Fatima al-Fihri.
  • The Abbasid caliph Harun al-Rashid’s wife, Zubayda, personally funded many construction projects for mosques, roads, and wells in the Hijaz, which greatly benefit the many students that traveled through these areas.
  • The wife of Ottoman Sultan Suleyman, Hurrem Sultan, endowned numerous madrasasin addition to other charitable works such as hospitals, public baths, and soup kitchens.
  • During the Ayyubid period of Damascus (1174 to 1260) 26 religious endownments (including madrasas, mosques, and religious monuments) were built by women.
Unlike Europe during the Middle Ages (and even up until the 1800s and 1900s), women played a major role in Islamic education in the past 1400 years. Rather than being seen as second-class citizens, women played an active role in public life, particularly in the field of education.

Modern History

The tradition of madrasas and other classical forms of Islamic education continues until today, although in a much more diminshed form. The defining factor for this was the encroachment of European powers on Muslim lands throughout the 1800s. In the Ottoman Empire, for example, French secularist advisors to the sultans advocated a complete reform of the educational system to remove religion from the curriculum and only teach secular sciences. Public schools thus began to teach a European curriculum based on European books in place of the traditional fields of knowledge that had been taught for hundreds of years. Although Islamic madrasas continued to exist, without government support they lost much of their relevance in the modern Muslim world.
Today, much of the former Ottoman Empire still runs education along European lines. For example, what you are allowed to major in at the university level depends on how you do on a certain standardized test at the end of your high school career. If you obtain the highest possible grades on the test, you can study sciences such as medicine or engineering. If one scores on the lower end of the spectrum, they are only allowed to study topics such as Islamic sciences and education.
Despite the new systems in place in much of the Muslim world, traditional education still survives. Universities such as al-Azhar, al-Karaouine, and Darul Uloom in Deoband, India continue to offer traditional curricula that bring together Islamic and secular sciences. Such an intellectual tradition rooted in the great institutions of the past that produced some of the greatest scholars of Islamic history and continues to spread the message and knowledge of Islam to the masses.
The source of this article is : lost Islamic History 

Friday, August 15, 2014

Islam peaceful message , friday Kutbah

Islam peaceful message to humanity

Islam , Muslims and non Muslims coexistence




Muslims and Christians together constitute over 50 percent of the world. If they lived in peace, we would be half way to world peace. One small step we can take towards fostering Muslim-Christian harmony is to tell and retell positive stories and abstain from mutual demonization.
In this article I propose to remind both Muslims and Christians about a promise that Prophet Muhammed (pbuh) made to Christians. The knowledge of this promise can have enormous impact on Muslim conduct towards Christians. Muslims generally respect the precedent of their Prophet and try to practice it in their lives.
In 628 AD, a delegation from St. Catherine’s Monastery came to Prophet Muhammed and requested his protection. He responded by granting them a charter of rights, which I reproduce below in its entirety. St. Catherine’s Monastery is located at the foot of Mt. Sinai and is the world’s oldest monastery. It possess a huge collection of Christian manuscripts, second only to the Vatican, and is a world heritage site. It also boasts the oldest collection of Christian icons. It is a treasure house of Christian history that has remained safe for 1,400 years under Muslim protection.
The Promise to St. Catherine:
“This is a message from Muhammad ibn Abdullah, as a covenant to those who adopt Christianity, near and far, we are with them.
Verily I, the servants, the helpers, and my followers defend them, because Christians are my citizens; and by Allah! I hold out against anything that displeases them.
No compulsion is to be on them. Neither are their judges to be removed from their jobs nor their monks from their monasteries. No one is to destroy a house of their religion, to damage it, or to carry anything from it to the Muslims’ houses.
Should anyone take any of these, he would spoil God’s covenant and disobey His Prophet. Verily, they are my allies and have my secure charter against all that they hate.
No one is to force them to travel or to oblige them to fight. The Muslims are to fight for them. If a female Christian is married to a Muslim, it is not to take place without her approval. She is not to be prevented from visiting her church to pray. Their churches are to be respected. They are neither to be prevented from repairing them nor the sacredness of their covenants.
No one of the nation (Muslims) is to disobey the covenant till the Last Day (end of the world).”
The first and the final sentence of the charter are critical. They make the promise eternal and universal. Muhammed asserts that Muslims are with Christians near and far, straight away rejecting any future attempts to limit the promise to St. Catherine alone. By ordering Muslims to obey it until the Day of Judgment the charter again undermines any future attempts to revoke the privileges. These rights are inalienable. Muhammed declared Christians, all of them, as his allies and he equated ill treatment of Christians with violating God’s covenant.
A remarkable aspect of the charter is that it imposes no conditions on Christians for enjoying its privileges. It is enough that they are Christians. They are not required to alter their beliefs, they do not have to make any payments and they do not have any obligations. This is a charter of rights without any duties!
The document is not a modern human rights treaty, but even though it was penned in 628 A.D. it clearly protects the right to property, freedom of religion, freedom of work, and security of the person.
I know most readers, must be thinking, So what? Well the answer is simple. Those who seek to foster discord among Muslims and Christians focus on issues that divide and emphasize areas of conflict. But when resources such as Muhammad’s promise to Christians is invoked and highlighted it builds bridges. It inspires Muslims to rise above communal intolerance and engenders good will in Christians who might be nursing fear of Islam or Muslims.
When I look at Islamic sources, I find in them unprecedented examples of religious tolerance and inclusiveness. They make me want to become a better person. I think the capacity to seek good and do good inheres in all of us. When we subdue this predisposition towards the good, we deny our fundamental humanity. In this holiday season, I hope all of us can find time to look for something positive and worthy of appreciation in the values, cultures and histories of other peoples.

Dr. Muqtedar Khan is Director of Islamic Studies at the University of Delaware and a fellow of the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding
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Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Prophet Muhammad in the Bible by Rachidm





CAIR Reiterates Condemnation of ISIS Violence, Religious Extremism


(WASHINGTON, DC, 8/11/2104) -- The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the nation's largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization, today reiterated its condemnation of the "un-Islamic and morally repugnant" violence and religious extremism of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).
In a statement, CAIR said:
"As we have stated previously, American Muslims view the actions of ISIS as both un-Islamic and morally repugnant. No interpretation of Islam condones the torture and murder of civilians, the destruction of houses of worship or the targeting of religious minorities.
"We reiterate our condemnation of the violent actions and religious extremism of ISIS and reject the false claim that it in any way represents mainstream Islamic thought or practice. ISIS's actions are neither Islamic nor humane, they are simply insane.
"We applaud the humanitarian effort to assist those surrounded by ISIS extremists in Iraq and hope the compassion expressed for Iraqi civilians will lead to similar actions to alleviate the suffering of civilian populations of Gaza, Burma (Myanmar), Syria, and the Central African Republic."
CAIR is America's largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization. Its mission is to enhance the understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding.

Please note the above statements are from Cair , the following are from an Islamic perspective based on Quran and prophet Muhammad sunnah and examples as understood by mainstream Muslims who are required to follow on his footsteps.

Islam is a religion of Mercy, Peace and Blessing. Its teachings emphasize kind heartedness, help, sympathy, forgiveness, sacrifice, love and care. Qur’an, the Shari’ah and the life of our beloved Prophet (SAW) mirrors this attribute, and it should be reflected in the conduct of a Momin ( a true believer ) . Islam appreciates those who are kind to their fellow human-being  and dislikes them who are hard hearted, , and hypocrite. Recall that historical moment, when Prophet (SAW) entered Makkah as a conqueror. There was before him a multitude of surrendered enemies, former oppressors and persecutors, who had evicted the Muslims from their homes, deprived them of their belongings, humiliated and intimidated Prophet (SAW) hatched schemes for his murder and tortured and killed his companions. But Prophet (SAW) displayed his usual magnanimity, generosity, and kind heartedness by forgiving all of them and declaring general amnesty.
The Qur’an, Islam’s revealed text, states: "Whoever kills a person [unjustly]…it is as though he has killed all mankind. And whoever saves a life, it is as though he had saved all mankind." (Qur’an, 5:32)
Prophet Muhammad said there is no excuse for committing unjust acts: "Do not be people without minds of your own, saying that if others treat you well you will treat them well, and that if they do wrong you will do wrong to them. Instead, accustom yourselves to do good if people do good and not to do wrong (even) if they do evil." (Al-Tirmidhi)

God mandates moderation in faith and in all aspects of life when He states in the Qur’an: “We made you to be a community of the middle way, so that (with the example of your lives) you might bear witness to the truth before all mankind.” (Qur’an, 2:143)

In another verse, God explains our duties as human beings when he says: “Let there arise from among you a band of people who invite to righteousness, and enjoin good and forbid evil.” (Qur’an, 3:104)

“Whoever kills a person who has a truce with the Muslims will never smell the fragrance of Paradise.” (Saheeh Muslim)


“Beware!  Whoever is cruel and hard on a non-Muslim minority, or curtails their rights, or burdens them with more than they can bear, or takes anything from them against their free will; I (Prophet Muhammad) will complain against the person on the Day of Judgment.” (Abu Dawud)

As Muslims ., we have to emulate the characteristics of Rasullah ( prophet & messenger ) Muhammads.a.w. We are asked to extend our love and affection to all humankind, regardless of race, religion, age, status, and whether or not they are our family members. We must care for them as a proof of our love for Allah, who has created them all.Islam teaches us to act in a caring manner to all of God's creation. The Prophet Muhammad, who is described in the Qur’an as “a mercy to the worlds” said: “All creation is the family of God, and the person most beloved by God (is the one) who is kind and caring toward His family."

In the light of the teachings of the Qur’an and Sunnah we clearly and strongly state:

1. All acts of terrorism targeting civilians are haram (forbidden) in Islam.
2. It is haram (forbidden) for a Muslim to cooperate with any individual or group that is involved in any act of terrorism or violence.
3. It is the civic and religious duty of Muslims to cooperate with law enforcement authorities to protect the lives of all civilians.

Saturday, August 9, 2014

A Jewish American policeman discover the beauty of Islam :

I am a typical American in many ways that are reflected in both my professional and personal lives. Professionally, I am a supervisor with a major police department, and I have been in the military, both active duty and in the reserves for the majority of my adult life.

 Personally, I live in the suburbs with my wife and child, drive a pickup truck and occasionally wear cowboy boots. I pay my bills, treat my neighbors well, and prior to my reversion/conversion to Islam, I followed my religion in the manner in which I had been instructed.

As I said, my life was that of a typical American, with my main concerns being the little details of everyday life that everyone worries about. Little did I know that my religious beliefs would take me out of the “typical” life that I lead, and that they would instead become a major factor in my life, providing me with a sense of peace and completion that only a short time before I would not have thought possible.

My journey to Islam began with my association, and later friendship, with a man named Nasir. I met Nasir through work in the late 1980’s, and was impressed with his manners and the way that he treated me. I had met very few Muslims, and I was always a little uneasy around them as I was not sure how they would accept me.

Besides having the appearance of a pickup-driving-shotgun-toting-redneck, I was also a Jew, and the combination often seemed to unsettle people. Nasir, however, took everything in stride, and as a result a friendship slowly bloomed. Through Nasir, I really formed my first impressions of Islam and its adherents.

Over the years I watched how Nasir dealt with different situations, and was constantly impressed with the wisdom and patience that he displayed when he was dealing with difficult people or situations. He always took the high road, even at times when I, if I had been in the same situation, would have been tempted to treat the persons differently.

If I asked him why he did certain things, he would tell me a bit of wisdom which guided his actions. Most of these, (I realized later), were direct or indirect quotes from the Quran, which he told me not in a proselytizing way, but in a gentle manner as if he were teaching a child the proper way to conduct itself in the world.

In fact, prior to reading the Quran, I often marveled at how one person could be so wise and knowledgeable! Little did I know that those guiding principles were written down where I or anyone else could read them. I realize now how blessed I am that I was exposed to Islam and Muslims in such a positive way.

 Around the winter of 2000, I began to have a serious interest in Islam. I read the Quran, but could not seem to fully understand it. Despite this difficulty, I continued to have a nagging feeling that I should continue, and so I studied other books about Islam. I learned a great deal, but in an academic and not in a spiritual way.

I double checked the dates of many of the modern “discoveries” that had been addressed in the Qur'an, and was astounded at what I found.


Again I attempted to read and understand the Quran, and again I had difficulties. I finally resolved to ask Nasir for help, and then the 9-11 incident happened. Suddenly I had a host of new worries, and I put my questions on hold. During this time period, I had a great deal of exposure to Islam, however very little of it was put to me in a positive manner.

As a police supervisor, I was constantly receiving warnings about perceived Islamic threats, and as an officer in the reserves I was around people who perceived Islam as a direct threat and Muslims as possible enemies. So, to my shame, I continued to wait and kept my studies on the Islamic world to those areas that directly influenced my professional life.

  Then, in the late summer of 2004, that nagging feeling that had persisted suddenly intensified, and I finally asked Nasir for guidance. He told me about the tenets of his faith, and about the nature of the Quran. More importantly, he told me how crucial Islam was to his life, and how strongly he believed in it, not only as the word of God, but as the way in which man was meant to live.

He and his brother Riyadh then provided me with booklets about Islam that had answers to many of the questions that I had. With this knowledge in hand, I again approached the Quran, and suddenly found that it was not only readable, but that it made sense! I can only think that either I was not mentally ‘ready’ before, or that I simply needed the extra input in order to properly understand and process the information. Either way, I read and re-read everything that I had been provided, and then double checked the facts that had been presented to me. The more I read, the more amazed I was.

I found that the information that was in the Quran would have been impossible for Muhammad to have known had he not been a Prophet. Not only would it have been impossible for a man of his background and geographic location to have known many of these things, it would have been impossible for anyone of his time-period to have known them. I double checked the dates of many of the modern “discoveries” that had been addressed in the Quran, and was astounded at what I found. Not only did the Quran contain information that was centuries ahead of its time, but it did so with details, many of which could not have been known until this century.

I did not receive any new information or beliefs, but was instead capable of understanding that which I had already learned.
I became convinced that Muhammad was indeed a Prophet that had been inspired by God through his angel. Despite this, I still faced a dilemma. Although I now believed that Muhammad was a Prophet, I still was confused about what to do. Everything that I had ever believed was suddenly turned upside down, and I was at a loss for an explanation.
That night I prayed for guidance and understanding. I only believed in one god, but I wanted to know the manner in which I should hold that belief. The prayer was simple, but heartfelt, and I went to sleep full of hope that I would receive an understanding of the situation. When I awoke, I did so with the feeling that I had experienced an epiphany.
Everything was suddenly clear, and I understood how all the things that I had practiced before were simply observances that had been contrived by man in an attempt to follow religious principles that had changed over the millennia. I did not receive any new information or beliefs, but was instead capable of understanding that which I had already learned. I felt exhilarated, happy and at peace, and that morning I said the shahadah.

I told Nasir, and he took me to a nearby mosque for the Friday prayers. At the mosque I was lead to the front by Nasir, and I told the assembled congregation about why I had come there. Then Nasir and the Iman helped me repeat the profession of faith in Arabic.

Although I was a little nervous, the joy I felt upon doing this far outweighed any other feelings that I had. Afterwards, I was welcomed by the majority of the members in a manner that was so welcoming that I can hardly describe it. Most of the congregation shook my hand and welcomed me to Islam, and many of them offered to help me or to answer any questions that I might have. It was a wonderful experience which I will never forget.

In closing, let me say that the feeling of peace that came over me is still with me, and although I am still very early in the learning stages, I am happy and confident that I made the right decision. I am still a redneck-looking, pickup truck-driving, typical American.

Only now I am a Muslim American, and with the continued guidance and assistance of people like Nasir and Riyadh, I hope to one day set as good an example for others and they have been for me.
The above article was published by the Deenshow 

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Reflections of Ramadan & the role of man by Imam Hatim

Islam4mankind will be delighted to host Imam Hatim Hamidullah :

" With all of of the knowledge & scripture that human beings have received over the span of man's life on this earth through prophets, messengers, and the knowledge and wisdom of many men and women we should have by now established better methods of solving human problems other than "WAR"

Please tune in tomorrow  Thursday to Islam4mankind weekly radio live from radio station lamagica1220am from 1:05 to 2 pm 


Islam4mankind weekly Radio every Thursday


Islam4mankind  weekly one hour program  every Thursday will be as usual on English / Spanish / Arabic , you may call ( 407 343 6001 ) to ask questions on any of these respected  languages of your choice.

Tune in today to your favorite weekly radio program Islam4mankind that will broadcast  live from Radio station 1220am from 1:07 to 2 pm.


People of different faiths or no faith   are welcome to  call  407 343 6001 to participate live on the show , we ask our dear callers to be respectful to both the audience and all faiths , thanks.

En Vivo :::La Magica 1220 AM, Siempre en el corazon del pueblo, Emisora Cristiana por Internet, Pred
www.magica1220am.com
Radio Emisora On line La Magica 1220 AM originada desde Kissimmee - Orlando en La Florida, USA. La emisora que Siempre esta en el Corazón del Pueblo. Bienvenidos.La Magica 1220 AM. En Vivo.



Chinese Quran reciter


67:1
Yusuf Ali
Blessed be He in Whose hands is Dominion; and He over all things hath Power;-
Chinese
多福哉擁有主權者!他對於萬事是全能的。

67:2
Yusuf Ali
He Who created Death and Life, that He may try which of you is best in deed: and He is the Exalted in Might, Oft-Forgiving;-
Chinese
他曾創造了死生,以便他考驗你們誰的作為是最優美的。他是萬能的,是至赦的。

67:3
Yusuf Ali
He Who created the seven heavens one above another: No want of proportion wilt thou see in the Creation of (Allah) Most Gracious. So turn thy vision again: seest thou any flaw?
Chinese
他創造了七層天,你在至仁主的所造物中,不能看出一點參差。你再看看!你究竟能看出甚麼缺陷呢?

67:4
Yusuf Ali
Again turn thy vision a second time: (thy) vision will come back to thee dull and discomfited, in a state worn out.
Chinese
然後你再看兩次,你的眼睛將昏花地、疲倦地轉回來!

67:5
Yusuf Ali
And we have, (from of old), adorned the lowest heaven with Lamps, and We have made such (Lamps) (as) missiles to drive away the Evil Ones, and have prepared for them the Penalty of the Blazing Fire.
Chinese
我確已以眾星點綴最近的天,並以眾星供惡魔們猜測。我已為他們預備火獄的刑罰。

67:6
Yusuf Ali
For those who reject their Lord (and Cherisher) is the Penalty of Hell: and evil is (such), Destination.
Chinese
不信主的人們將受火獄的刑罰,那歸宿真惡劣!

67:7
Yusuf Ali
When they are cast therein, they will hear the (terrible) drawing in of its breath even as it blazes forth,
Chinese
當他們被投入火獄的時候,他們將聽見沸騰的火獄發出驢鳴般的聲音。

67:8
Yusuf Ali
Almost bursting with fury: Every time a Group is cast therein, its Keepers will ask, "Did no Warner come to you?"
Chinese
火獄幾乎為憤怒而破碎,每有一群人被投入其中,管火獄的天神們就對他們說:「難道沒有任何警告者降臨你們嗎?」

67:9
Yusuf Ali
They will say: "Yes indeed; a Warner did come to us, but we rejected him and said, 'Allah never sent down any (Message): ye are nothing but an egregious delusion!'"
Chinese
他們說:「不然!警告者確已降臨我們了,但我們否認他們,我們說:『真主沒有降示甚麼,你們只在重大的迷誤中。』」

67:10
Yusuf Ali
They will further say: "Had we but listened or used our intelligence, we should not (now) be among the Companions of the Blazing Fire!"
Chinese
他們說:「假若我們能聽從,或能明理,我們必不致淪於火獄的居民之列!」

67:11
Yusuf Ali
They will then confess their sins: but far will be (Forgiveness) from the Companions of the Blazing Fire!
Chinese
他們承認他們的罪過。讓火獄的居民遠離真主的慈恩!

67:12
Yusuf Ali
As for those who fear their Lord unseen, for them is Forgiveness and a great Reward.
Chinese
在秘密中畏懼主的人們,將蒙赦宥和重大的報酬。

67:13
Yusuf Ali
And whether ye hide your word or publish it, He certainly has (full) knowledge, of the secrets of (all) hearts.
Chinese
你們可以隱匿你們的言語;也可以把它說出來。他確是全知心事的。

67:14
Yusuf Ali
Should He not know,- He that created? and He is the One that understands the finest mysteries (and) is well-acquainted (with them).
Chinese
創造者既是玄妙而且徹知的,難道他不知道你們所隱匿的言語嗎?

67:15
Yusuf Ali
It is He Who has made the earth manageable for you, so traverse ye through its tracts and enjoy of the Sustenance which He furnishes: but unto Him is the Resurrection.
Chinese
他為你們而使大地平穩,你們應當在大地的各方行走,應當吃他的給養,你們復活後,只歸於他。

67:16
Yusuf Ali
Do ye feel secure that He Who is in heaven will not cause you to be swallowed up by the earth when it shakes (as in an earthquake)?
Chinese
難道你們不怕在天上的主使大地在震蕩的時候吞咽你們嗎?

67:17
Yusuf Ali
Or do ye feel secure that He Who is in Heaven will not send against you a violent tornado (with showers of stones), so that ye shall know how (terrible) was My warning?
Chinese
難道你們不怕在天上的主使飛沙走石的暴風摧毀你們嗎?你們將知道我的警告是怎樣的。

67:18
Yusuf Ali
But indeed men before them rejected (My warning): then how (terrible) was My rejection (of them)?
Chinese
在他們之前逝去的人們,確已否認眾使者,我的譴責是怎樣的?

67:19
Yusuf Ali
Do they not observe the birds above them, spreading their wings and folding them in? None can uphold them except (Allah) Most Gracious: Truly (Allah) Most Gracious: Truly it is He that watches over all things.
Chinese
難道他們沒有看見在他們的上面展翅和歛翼的眾鳥嗎?只有至仁主維持它們,他確是明察萬物的。

67:20
Yusuf Ali
Nay, who is there that can help you, (even as) an army, besides (Allah) Most Merciful? In nothing but delusion are the Unbelievers.
Chinese
除了真主援助你們外,還有誰能做你們的援軍呢?你們只陷於自欺之中。

67:21
Yusuf Ali
Or who is there that can provide you with Sustenance if He were to withhold His provision? Nay, they obstinately persist in insolent impiety and flight (from the Truth).
Chinese
誰能供給你們呢?如果至仁主扣留他的給養。不然,他們固執著驕傲和勃逆。

67:22
Yusuf Ali
Is then one who walks headlong, with his face grovelling, better guided,- or one who walks evenly on a Straight Way?
Chinese
究竟誰更能獲得引導呢?是匍匐而行的人呢?還是在正路上挺身而行的人呢?

67:23
Yusuf Ali
Say: "It is He Who has created you (and made you grow), and made for you the faculties of hearing, seeing, feeling and understanding: little thanks it is ye give.
Chinese
你說:「他是創造你們,並為你們創造耳、目和心的。你們卻很少感謝。」

67:24
Yusuf Ali
Say: "It is He Who has multiplied you through the earth, and to Him shall ye be gathered together."
Chinese
你說:「他是使你們繁殖於大地上的,你們將來要被集合到他那裡。」

67:25
Yusuf Ali
They ask: When will this promise be (fulfilled)? - If ye are telling the truth.
Chinese
他們說:「這個警告甚麼時候實現呢?如果你們是誠實的人。」

67:26
Yusuf Ali
Say: "As to the knowledge of the time, it is with Allah alone: I am (sent) only to warn plainly in public."
Chinese
你說:「關於此事的知識,只在主那裡,我只是一個坦率的警告者。」

67:27
Yusuf Ali
At length, when they see it close at hand, grieved will be the faces of the Unbelievers, and it will be said (to them): "This is (the promise fulfilled), which ye were calling for!"
Chinese
當他們看見這應許臨近的時候,不信的人們的面目將變成黑的!或者將說:「這就是你們生前妄言不會實現的事。」

67:28
Yusuf Ali
Say: "See ye?- If Allah were to destroy me, and those with me, or if He bestows His Mercy on us,- yet who can deliver the Unbelievers from a grievous Penalty?"
Chinese
你說:「你們告訴我吧,如果真主毀滅我,和我的同道,或憐憫我們,那末,誰使不信道的人們得免於痛苦的刑罰呢?」

67:29
Yusuf Ali
Say: "He is (Allah) Most Gracious: We have believed in Him, and on Him have we put our trust: So, soon will ye know which (of us) it is that is in manifest error."
Chinese
你說:「他是至仁主,我們已信仰他,我們只信賴他。你們將知道誰在明顯的迷誤中。」

67:30
Yusuf Ali
Say: "See ye?- If your stream be some morning lost (in the underground earth), who then can supply you with clear-flowing water?"
Chinese
你說:「你們告訴我吧,如果你們的水一旦滲漏了,誰能給你們一條流水呢?」